Damien Schiff on the Endangered Species Act

When does environmental protection become regulatory overreach? As part of the "Great Reset" agenda to "Build Back Better," Biden's new America the Beautiful report outlines plans to conserve 30 percent of the nation’s lands and waters by 2030 – reversing many sensible reforms to the Endangered Species Act, for example, that have occurred over the last four years.

Remember the infamous Louisiana frog case? Federal agents in the Obama administration deprived a landowner of property by designating 1,500 acres of his land as "critical habitat" for the dusky gopher frog... a creature that hadn't been seen in the Bayou State for more than 50 years. Thankfully, Pacific Legal Foundation successfully defended the landowner in a 9-0 Supreme Court victory.

Now, the federal government under Biden is overreaching once again – weaponizing environmentalism against property rights. The Endangered Species Act may have good intentions, but its implementation has caused untold harm to countless human beings, while distorting incentives for achieving actual conservation.

I was joined by Damien Schiff to discuss the Biden administration's despotic approach to environmental regulation. Damien is a senior attorney at Pacific Legal Foundation. He leads its environmental practice group, a unique initiative that draws broadly from PLF’s expertise and success in property rights and separation of powers litigation. Over the years, Damien has represented hundreds of landowners and property rights advocates to defend their liberties against heavy-handed and unwarranted environmental and land-use regulation.

Find out how you can help in the fight against federal overreach on the show of ideas, not attitude.

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Navigate Post-Censorship Social Media with Confidence

From Parler and Gab to MeWe and Bitchute, learn everything you need to know from my brief guide to the various sites where free speech still lives (allegedly), and how they stack up to the more mainstream competition like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

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